Now’s the time to write your book

March 30, 2020 § Leave a comment

There’s never been a better time to publish

Are you one of those individuals who’s always been meaning to write a book but never had the time?

Suddenly you have loads of time – and plenty of potential readers who also have loads of time.

Never in history has there been a more ideal moment to get going on the literary venture you’ve been thinking about for ages. And never before has it been so easy to publish.

Starting at the very beginning:

  1. ‘Everyone has a book in them, but in most cases that’s where it should stay’ Nobody’s actually sure who said that. However it’s a worthwhile saying and you need to put your words to that test when you get them down on paper.
  2. If you believe they pass, give your manuscript to a trusted friend to read, a friend who isn’t going to say what you want to hear but what you need to hear. If they feel your book is a good read, it’s time to progress to the next step.
  3. Get a professional to proofread and copyedit it. I’m not going to say much about that because it’s what I do and this blog is not a sales pitch. You need a professional because they’re good with words and can also spot what you’ve actually written not what you think you’ve written. Don’t rely on a spellcheck: there, they’re and their can all get past a spellcheck even though they have different meanings.
  4. Now you’re at the publishing stage. It’s never been easier to get published and gone are the days when you had to wait for an agent or publishing company to consider your manuscript. You can upload it instantly. In theory.

There are plenty of publishing companies to choose from: Kindle Direct Publishing, Kobo. Lulu, Smashwords, BookBaby, Blurb, Google Play Books – I could go on. But here, I would suggest, is your first real problem if, like me, you’re a writer but not a technical wizard.

Which of those are you going to choose?

I know KDP is a market leader but when I just looked at the website it’s told me I have to format my manuscript and create a cover. So if your strength is in writing, not formatting and design, will you be ok?

An author’s review of Lulu doesn’t give me much confidence either – I write my book, design the cover and upload everything. It doesn’t cost me money, but time and experience. If there are typos in it, then I wrote them and I didn’t notice them. Yes – but your readers will notice your typos.

I honestly don’t get what this Smashwords review is talking about – Smashwords (sic) web-based interface is specifically intended for the upload of files, metadata and book project management. What does that even mean?

If I were you I’d concentrate on writing your book and get someone else to do the techie stuff.

For one thing, I’ve been told that the cover is everything in the crowded world of ebooks, so I’d definitely want someone to do that. For another thing, I don’t talk ebook publishing language or feel confident formatting and uploading files. So I’d ask someone who understands to do it properly.

Bad formatting is like losing all the structure of a regular letter. So instead of seeing ‘Dear Whoever’ on one line and all the rest appearing in paragraphs starting on different lines, it will all run on into one fat chunk of text. I’m not going to risk that sort of mistake happening.

I don’t want to have spent ages and ages writing a book that I really believe in, only to trash it with a cock-handed effort at self-publishing. That is definitely a skill in its own right.

The ebookdesigner (John Amy) is one of many companies who will take the techie stuff off your hands AND design you a great cover, specific to your book. He recommends sticking with Amazon, the market leader and biggest distributor for your self-published ebook. John says that good design can make you more money simply because you come across as a professional. If money isn’t the main aim of your game, but the message is, you still need to get reader attention and the cover is integral to that.

He thinks it’s a good idea to also release a print version – something he can help you with. That makes it more accessible to ‘real book’ lovers and, again, makes you appear a more professional author. It’s also an opportunity to sell more, of course.

For the time being, just get some words down on paper/screen and see where they take you. It’s an interesting break from the TV and a welcome rest from cleaning stuff that doesn’t need cleaning or decorating walls that don’t need decorating.

Set aside an hour or two daily to write, it will add some structure to your day. And if it doesn’t come easily at the beginning, think of the Jodi Picoult quote –

You might not write well every day, but you can always edit a bad page. You can’t edit a blank page.

Do you know about Bowler Hat?

February 10, 2014 § 2 Comments

Actually I don’t mean do you know about Bowler Hat Media, the agency, but do you know about bowler hat, the hat? I confess I didn’t until just now when I was looking though a new book I bought the other day, Bloomers, Biros & Wellington Boots – How the Names Became the Words.

It talks about the famous one we all know, for example – Hoover – which is a word many of us tend to use for a vacuum cleaner but was in fact handed down by Henry Hoover who invented a contraption to suck up dirt so should really only be applied to that specific brand.

Bloomers, biros and wellington boots are similarly named after their inventors and, I was surprised, to see, so is the bowler hat. Well, sort of – I’m not sure how convinced I am about this one. I thought the hat got its name from being bowl-shaped but the book maintains that bowler is a derivative of Beaulieu, the surname of feltmakers Thomas and William who were involved in its production.

This book by Andrew Sholl is full of gems and some others I liked  were:

  • mentor – in Greek mythology Mentor was an old friend of Odysseus who acted as an adviser to his son;
  • plimsolls – English politician Samuel Plimsoll (late 19th century) campaigned against unsafe conditions at sea. He became known as the sailor’s friend and gave his name to new rubber-soled footwear introduced on boats;
  • mesmerise – Austrian physician Frank Mesmer used hypnosis as a therapy back in the 18th century and gave his name to the word;
  • galvanise – Luigi Galvani, a professor of anatomy in Italy discovered that frogs’ legs would move and twitch when they came into contact with metal during a thunderstorm;
  • biro – it was Lazlo Biro, a Hungarian journalist, who hit upon the idea of a pen with a steel ball to control the ink flow and he registered his first patent in 1943;
  • bloomers – womens rights campaigner Amelia Jenks Bloomer (1818-94) saw the baggy knickers as good, comfy wear for women;
  • wellington boots – it was the Duke of Wellington (1769-1852) who made them popular and gave them his name.

It got me thinking, what legacy have I left that should be named after me in years to come? But, you see, there’s a major flaw in that thought, nobody can pronounce the name, Lefebve and that includes some of my own family…..

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